Potosí

‘Potosí’ se publicará en inglés / ‘Potosí’ will be published in English

Dentro de unos meses, una editorial publicará ‘Potosí‘ en inglés. Tim Gutteridge, que ha sudado tinta para traducir los insultos de los mineros bolivianos -“mono culeao, cara de chuño, que te saco la puta”- y otro montón de bolivianismos, ha escrito esta presentación del libro:

In Potosí, Ander Izagirre tells the story of Alicia, a 14-year-old girl who lives on the slopes of Cerro Rico de Potosí, the mineral-rich mountain in Bolivia whose silver and other metals were a key source of wealth for the Spanish Empire from the 16th to the 19th centuries. Alicia shares an adobe-brick hut with her mother and younger sister on a windswept esplanade at the entrance to the mine which dominates their lives. The mining cooperative provides Alicia’s family with their makeshift home in exchange for her mother’s work guarding the equipment that is stored in a nearby hut; although Alicia is officially too young to be employed, she supplements the family income by working shifts in the mine, pushing a trolley full of rocks through underground tunnels for 2 euros a night. The toxic dust of the mine floats in the air they breathe and seeps into the water supply.

At the foot of the mountain, the city of Potosí, for so long a source of fabulous wealth, remains a place of immense poverty. Atlhough the rich seams of the past have all been exhausted, there are still over 10,000 people working in the mines (many of them children like Alicia) in small-scale, informal operations. They remove the rock by hand and transport it to the surface, where US and Japanese-owned multinationals grind it down and process it to extract the remaining ore. The resultant damage – both to the environment and to those who live and work in or near the mines – is devastating.

Izagirre skilfully uses this intimate portrait of a single family and the place where they live to tell a larger story: how the ‘blessing’ of mineral wealth has cursed Bolivia throughout its history, attracting the Spanish conquistadores who created a system of slave labour to extract the metal, and giving birth in the 19th century to a brutal local oligarchy that ruled over one of the poorest and most unequal countries on the planet. The country’s modern history has been marked by a series of military dictatorships, often installed with US backing with the express purpose of guaranteeing the flow of raw materials, and the economy remains extremely vulnerable to any fluctuation in the prices of tin and other minerals.

At the same time, this is a narrative that is not afraid of confronting uncomfortable truths, and Izagirre shows how the terrible working conditions and appalling safety record of the mines have not only caused the deaths of hundreds of thousands of miners through the centuries, but have spawned a patriarchal social system in which the miners, brutalised and traumatised by their experiences and numbed by alcohol, pass this on to their wives and children in the form of violence and physical and sexual abuse. This system has its symbolic focus in the figure of El Tío, a diabolic subterranean male counterpart to Pachamama, the Andean earth goddess, and goes hand in hand with active attempts to exclude women from the public and political spheres.

Although the story of Alicia and her family are at the centre of Izagirre’s account, he interweaves it with accounts of the lives of several other people: Pedro Villca, at 59 an ‘improbably old’ miner who is the author’s guide in the mines; Father Gregorio, an Oblate priest from northern Spain who was sent to Bolivia in the 1960s to run a Catholic radio station, and was hounded by the authorities for siding with the poor; Che Guevara, who died in a doomed attempt to light the fuse of a peasants’ and workers’ revolution in Bolivia; and Klaus Barbie, the Nazi fugitive who took refuge in Bolivia and put his skills to use by organising death squads on behalf of the CIA-backed dictator, General Barrientos.

The result is a uniquely engaging mixture of memoir, reportage, travel writing and history that is reminiscent of Ryszard Kapuściński at his peak.

Originally published by Libros del K.O. Details of UK publisher, dates and title coming shortly…

*

Excerpt 1

“A woman can’t enter the mine,” Pedro Villca tells me. “Can you imagine? The woman has her period and Pachamama gets jealous. Then Pachamama hides the ore and the seam disappears.”

Villca is an old miner, an unlikely combination in Bolivia. He’s 59 and none of his comrades have made it to his age. He’s alive, he says, because he was never greedy. Most miners work for months or even years without a break. Most miners end up working 24-hour shifts, fuelled by coca leaves and liquor, a practice for which they have invented a verb, veinticuatrear: ‘to twenty-four’. Instead he would come up to the surface, go back to his parents’ village for a few months to grow potatoes and herd llamas, fill his lungs with clean air to flush the dust out of them, and then go back to the mine. But he was never there when his companions were asphyxiated by a pocket of gas or crushed by a rockfall. He knows he’s already taken too many chances with death and that he shouldn’t push his luck. So he’s decided to retire. He swears that in a few weeks’ time he’ll retire.

Excerpt 2

Alicia opens her fist and shows me three stones the colour of lead, speckled with sparkling spots: particles of silver. She has pilfered them from the mine.

She wraps the stones in newspaper, puts the package in her backpack and disappears behind the canvas sacks to change her clothes. She takes off the overalls and puts on some jeans, a blue tracksuit top and a knitted hat. She grabs the backpack, and we leave the hut and walk downhill.

She’s 14 years old, and her hands are dry and tough, bleached by the dust of the mountain.

The wind sweeps the slopes: fragments of rock scatter before it, the rubble groans. The dust of Cerro Rico gets in your eyes, between your teeth, into your lungs. It contains arsenic, which causes cancer, and it contains cadmium, zinc, chrome and lead, all of which accumulate in the blood, gradually poisoning the body until it is exhausted. The dust also contains silver: between 120 and 150 grams of silver for every ton of dust. Every visitor takes away a few particles of Potosí silver in their lungs. It’s because of these particles, the need to separate them from all the others, that Alicia lives in an adobe hut on the mountain.

cerrados

Por todo lo alto

Ya decía mi abuela que yo iba a llegar alto escribiendo: la semana próxima presentaré ‘Potosí’ a 3.600 metros de altitud, en La Paz (Bolivia). Será el martes 13 de marzo, a las 19.00, en el Centro Cultural de España, por si os viene de paso. Lo organiza la editorial El Cuervo

Y ya decía que iba a llegar lejos: el 28 de marzo lo presentaré en Santiago de Chile (lugar y hora, pendientes de confirmación). Lo organiza Libros del revés.

(Al neozelandés Edmund Hillary, uno de los dos primeros en pisar la cumbre del Everest, le preguntaron cómo era eso de vivir tan lejos. Y respondió: “Tan lejos de qué”).

Imagen de previsualización de YouTube

2

Dicen de ‘Potosí’

Aquí dejo algunas de las reseñas, menciones y premios que ha recibido ‘Potosí‘ este año.

  • Martín Caparrós, en El País:

“Potosí te cuenta la historia pequeña de una niña minera y, a través de ella, te cuenta una historia universal. Cumple lo que decía Kapuscinski: encontrar la gota de agua en la que se refleja todo lo que hay alrededor. Y eso está muy bien trabajado en este libro.

Lo que más me interesó es cómo toma a contrapié lo que uno imagina a priori sobre cómo va a ser este relato. Es un relato sobre pobres mineros, gente muy explotada, gente muy jodida, sobre víctimas. Pero te muestra cómo esas víctimas a veces se convierten en victimarios, cómo ellos mismos ejercen mucha violencia sobre los demás. Los relatos, cuando hablan de víctimas, suelen limar sus asperezas y silenciar sus contradicciones. Izagirre las muestra. Es una actitud muy valiente y le da espesor al relato”.

  • Txani Rodríguez, Radio Euskadi:

“Izagirre hace un documentado recorrido histórico por Bolivia, con su pericia habitual para la narración, y consigue situarnos ante nuestras propias contradicciones. Se lleva por delante un puñado de nuestras certezas bienintencionadas”.

  • Revista Letras corsarias:

“Izagirre, en la más pura tradición del periodismo narrativo, explica los mecanismos que determinan que cada mañana una niña tenga que entrar a la mina: la ciudad sin ley que rodea al yacimiento, la pobreza extrema junto a la riqueza natural, el asesinato de legisladores reformistas, la corrupción política, la violencia cotidiana”.

  • Jorge Raya, The Objective:

“Cada libro de Ander Izagirre es un respiro. Nos ofrece un periodismo que necesita tiempo, valor, paciencia y sentido de la responsabilidad”.

  • Ricardo Martínez Llorca, revista Culturamas:

“Eduardo Galeano y su espíritu flotan en Potosí, como también Naomi Klein y La doctrina del shock. Pero Izagirre siempre se arrima más al suelo que la escritora canadiense, y en el suelo se topa con personas humildes, con vidas en la miseria. Si Naomi Klein escribe sobre el bosque, Izagirre lo hace sobre cada uno de los árboles.

Algo hay que hacer para torcer el rumbo del horror. Potosí contiene el azote que nos debemos dar. Gracias, Izagirre, por acribillarnos con esa bala. Nos la hemos merecido”.

  • Javier Pérez de Albéniz, El descodificador:

“Ander Izagirre es uno de los grandes tapados del periodismo español. Un reportero a la vieja usanza, si hablamos de técnica exquisita y respeto por la profesión. Un periodista del siglo XXI, si nos referimos a asumir riesgos, a una cintura prodigiosa, a la ironía y el humor.

“Potosí es una historia escrita por un tipo que trabaja sin chubasquero, que se mueve con soltura en el barro y que no duda en mancharse las manos. Por un escritor que hace periodismo, o por un reportero al que se lee con entusiasmo. El equilibrio perfecto entre datos, información, y una literatura luminosa. Un placer que nos arrastra a las entrañas de la tierra, uno de los lugares más peligrosos del planeta, cementerio de mineros y, como cuenta Izagirre, lugar de nacimiento del primer capitalismo boliviano.

El hombre explotado por el hombre. La riqueza más gloriosa junto a la pobreza más atroz. Eso es Potosí, y así lo cuenta Ander Izagirre, uno de los últimos reporteros puros, un periodista de aquellos que se debe leer absolutamente todo cuanto escribe. Incluido, por supuesto, este intenso, claustrofóbico y brillante “Potosí”.

2

‘Potosí’ ya está en Potosí

Esto sí que es la cumbre de una carrera literaria: una presentación a 4.067 metros de altitud.

La editorial El Cuervo presentará la edición boliviana de ‘Potosí’ en Potosí (el 28 de septiembre, a las 19.00, en la Casa de la Moneda). Y como aperitivo han montado este vídeo de un minutillo.

Imagen de previsualización de YouTube

 

 

cerrados

Una vez conocido, es imposible olvidarlo

“Una vez conocida esta realidad, es imposible olvidarla”.

Me alegra mucho que Edurne Portela haya escrito una reseña de ‘Potosí’ en La Marea y me alegra que haya escrito precisamente esa frase.

 

 

cerrados

‘Potosí’ en Bolivia, claro

Esto me alegra mucho: Potosí también se va a publicar en Bolivia, con la editorial El Cuervo. Ya está en imprenta.

Muchas gracias a Álex Ayala, Libros del K.O., Paola Bacherer y Fernando Barrientos por la ayuda.

cerrados

Caparrós habla sobre ‘Potosí’

Martín Caparrós habla de Potosí, el libro de “un vasco más o menos joven”.

Imagen de previsualización de YouTube
cerrados

Presentaciones de ‘Potosí’ en Pamplona, Bilbao, Madrid y Barcelona

Seguimos con las presentaciones del libro Potosí.

PAMPLONA. 3 de febrero, a las 19.00. En la librería Katakrak (calle Mayor, 54). Presentará don Daniel Burgui.

BILBAO. 6 de febrero, a las 19.30. En la librería Cámara (calle Euskalduna, 6). Presentará June Fernández.

MADRID. 21 de febrero, a las 19.30. En la librería Traficantes de sueños. C/ Duque de Alba, 13.

BARCELONA. 2 de marzo, a las 19.00. En la librería Altaïr. Gran Vía, 616. Presentará Martín Caparrós.

‘Potosí’ ya está a la venta en librerías y en la web de Libros del K.O.

portada_final

Copio de la contraportada:

“El Cerro Rico de Potosí, emperador de todos los montes, pirámide de todos los minerales, palacio de todos los tesoros, es hoy un vertedero de escombros que amenaza con derrumbarse sobre los diez mil mineros que entran todos los días.

Potosí fue el escenario de los conquistadores españoles que acumularon la plata, de los barones mineros que instauraron el primer capitalismo boliviano, de la revolución de 1952, las masacres militares y la última guerrilla del Che. Del subsuelo salieron los obreros que tumbaron dictaduras; ahora salen niños que se manifiestan y consiguen leyes para trabajar a partir de los diez años.

En ‘Potosí’ están los mecanismos de la riqueza extraordinaria y de la pobreza tan ordinaria. En ‘Potosí’ está la violencia. Al final de la cadena hay una niña de doce años que entra a trabajar en la mina. Esa niña se llama Alicia y ‘Potosí’ cuenta su historia”.

cerrados

Presentamos ‘Potosí’ en San Sebastián, Tolosa y resto del mundo

Empezamos con las presentaciones del libro Potosí.

24 de enero, a las 19.30: SAN SEBASTIÁN. En la cripta de la Biblioteca Central, calle San Jerónimo, Parte Vieja. Presentará don Daniel Burgui.

25 de enero, a las 20.00: TOLOSA.  Bidaiarien Txokoan. Josu Iztuetak aurkeztuko du.

21 de febrero: MADRID. En la librería Traficantes de sueños. C/ Duque de Alba, 13.

2 de marzo: BARCELONA. En la librería Altaïr. Gran Vía, 616. Presentará Martín Caparrós.

También lo presentaremos en Pamplona y Bilbao, pero todavía no hemos concretado la fecha. Avisaremos.

‘Potosí’ llega pronto a las librerías y ya está a la venta en la web de Libros del K.O.

portada_final

Copio de la contraportada:

“El Cerro Rico de Potosí, emperador de todos los montes, pirámide de todos los minerales, palacio de todos los tesoros, es hoy un vertedero de escombros que amenaza con derrumbarse sobre los diez mil mineros que entran todos los días.

Potosí fue el escenario de los conquistadores españoles que acumularon la plata, de los barones mineros que instauraron el primer capitalismo boliviano, de la revolución de 1952, las masacres militares y la última guerrilla del Che. Del subsuelo salieron los obreros que tumbaron dictaduras; ahora salen niños que se manifiestan y consiguen leyes para trabajar a partir de los diez años.

En ‘Potosí’ están los mecanismos de la riqueza extraordinaria y de la pobreza tan ordinaria. En ‘Potosí’ está la violencia. Al final de la cadena hay una niña de doce años que entra a trabajar en la mina. Esa niña se llama Alicia y ‘Potosí’ cuenta su historia”.

cerrados

Publico libro nuevo: ‘Potosí’

¡Buf, pues ya está! Publico libro nuevo: Potosí (en Libros del K.O.). Sale a la venta el 23 de enero. El 24 de enero lo presentaremos en San Sebastián, el 21 de febrero en Madrid y el 2 de marzo en Barcelona. Ya iremos dando los detalles.

portada_final

(La ilustración de la portada es de Javier Muñoz: un lujo).

Copio de la contraportada:

“El Cerro Rico de Potosí, emperador de todos los montes, pirámide de todos los minerales, palacio de todos los tesoros, es hoy un vertedero de escombros que amenaza con derrumbarse sobre los diez mil mineros que entran todos los días.

Potosí fue el escenario de los conquistadores españoles que acumularon la plata, de los barones mineros que instauraron el primer capitalismo boliviano, de la revolución de 1952, las masacres militares y la última guerrilla del Che. Del subsuelo salieron los obreros que tumbaron dictaduras; ahora salen niños que se manifiestan y consiguen leyes para trabajar a partir de los diez años.

En ‘Potosí’ están los mecanismos de la riqueza extraordinaria y de la pobreza tan ordinaria. En ‘Potosí’ está la violencia. Al final de la cadena hay una niña de doce años que entra a trabajar en la mina. Esa niña se llama Alicia y ‘Potosí’ cuenta su historia”.

cerrados

Escribe tu correo:

Delivered by FeedBurner



Escribo con los veinte dedos.
Kazetari alderraia naiz
(Más sobre mí)